Gerard Henderson passed away on August 2, 2014. We are looking for the present owners of his paintings, drawings and creations. We need high-resolution photos as we are trying to catalogue his work and possibly include some in his upcoming book.

If you can assist us in any way, Kindly email us at: friendsofgerardhenderson@gmail.com

  • Rio de Janeiro, 1850’s

    Rio de Janeiro, 1850’s

  • Rio close up

    Rio close up

Port of London blending into Gloucester Seaport, New England

Port of London blending into Gloucester Seaport, New England

Rio close up

Rio close up

London close up

London close up

Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong, 1860’s

Victoria Harbour, Hong Kong, 1860’s

  • Istanbul 1850's

    Istanbul 1850's

  • Hong Kong close up

    Hong Kong close up

  • New York Harbour close up

    New York Harbour close up

Istanbul close up

Istanbul close up

New York Harbour, 1850’s

New York Harbour, 1850’s

Istanbul, 1850’s

Istanbul, 1850’s

La Haina, Maui, 1860’s

La Haina, Maui, 1860’s

The Skyclub mural, previously on the 56th floor of the Metlife Building, New York City, was originally commissioned in 1965 by Pan American World Airways, the mural was 80 ft. long painting, painted in oil on canvas, depicting the various ports-of-call of the early Clipper ships that sailed the world in the 1830s. It is no coincidence that Juan Trippe, the founder of Pan American World Airways, was fascinated with Clipper ships and named his Pan Am aircraft after them. The mural begins with Gloucester Seaport (circa 1830) in New England, continues to Rio de Janeiro (1850s), the Port of London (1830s), Constantinople (Istanbul circa 1850), Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour (1860s), Lahian Maui (circa 1860s) and ends with New York Harbour in the 1850s. This mural was finally completed for the entrance lobby in May 1966.

In December 2005, the Sky Club on the 56th floor of the now called MetLife Building, at 200 Park Avenue, New York City, was closed and the fate of the extraordinary 80 foot long mural was thrown into uncertainty. But on January 25, 2006, the Stamford Auction House entertained bids for the mural. Ed Trippe, son of Juan Trippe, eagerly placed a bid with an eye to keeping the mural, ( commissioned by his father for Pan Am ), “in the family”. Ed Tripp’s plan was to bring the mural to Bermuda, where he headed the development of a luxurious residential and resort community, perched above Castle Harbour and the ocean, called Tucker’s Point Hotel & Spa. The development occupies land acquired by his father in the 1950s.

Ed Trippe won the bid and found himself the new owner of the mural. The artist wrote to him at that time saying “It is truly the wish and will of the Gods that the mural finds its rightful place with you”. The mural was eventually removed from the walls of the old Sky Club by museum experts and transported to Bermuda. There, it is now lovingly displayed once again, in the new very exclusive, luxurious Tucker’s Point Hotel & Spa, and not too far from a portrait of Juan Trippe.

Click below to see more on the indicated murals...